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7 In 1 Foldable, Portable and Multipurpose Device...

Pankit Gami & Ekta Patel, a young Indian Inventor whose invention has recognized at national and international level.He with her classmate Ekta Patel,  innovate 7 in 1 Foldable, Portable and multipurpose device, which can be convert into Trolley, Chair, Bed, Ladder, Hammock, Table and Stool , got many national and international recognitions. He has been appreciated by former President of India H.E.  Dr. APJ Abdul Kalam via NIF at IIM Ahmadabad in 2011 for the best innovation among 5000 ...

(Saturday, 29 June 2013 18:21)
Solar powered i-slate for Indian students...

An iPad might be a fashion statement for some while a necessity for others. But unlike the i-slate, it is definitely not a life changing possession for anyone. I-Slate is a cheap, solar-powered computer tablet that has transformed the lives of the children of Mohamed Hussainpally Village School in Andhra Pradesh. Developed through a partnership of Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and Houston’s Rice University  these tablets are designed to help children in developing countries ...

(Wednesday, 26 June 2013 15:24)
India’s representatives for the Henkel Innovation Challenge 2013...

 

 

 

Aditya Yadav and Harshvardhan Pande are winners of the National Henkel Innovation Challenge 6...

 

They will represent India in the global finals, which will be held in Shanghai and will see participation of students from 27 countries.

 

The competition, themed ‘Triple the value you create. Create a sustainable world’ saw 800 registrations which were narrowed down to 10 for the finals. College students were asked to develop a concept for a product or technology for the year 2050.

...

(Wednesday, 26 June 2013 15:23)
Classical Indian dancer wins $30K Walter Carsen Prize...

Classical Indian dancer and choreographer Menaka Thakkar has won the 2012 Walter Carsen Prize for Excellence in the Performing Arts...

 

Menaka was born in 1942 in Bombay. She is a master of three classical Indian dance styles: bharatanatyam, odissi and kuchipudi. She began studying bharatanatyam at the age of four and, by her mid-twenties, she was also proficient in odissi and kuchipudi.

 

Audiences received Thakkar’s 1972 Canadian tour with great enthusiasm, which encouraged Thakkar to ...

(Wednesday, 26 June 2013 15:22)
Coimbatore team wins ‘Freescale Cup 2013′ intelligent car race...

Electronic Systems Engineering (DESE) and the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), and is part of Freescale’s initiative to promote innovation and creative thinking in engineering students across the world.

 

The 3rd edition of the Freescale Cup drew 225 teams from 70 colleges, of which 50 teams faced off in the grand finale. Freescale provided model car kits, development tools based on Freescale microcontroller technology, and technical support for the students, who had to develop a prototype ...

(Wednesday, 26 June 2013 15:21)
Upliftment of Burmese Refugees by students from IIT Delhi...

 

 

 

While few Indians are busy ingraining feelings of regionalism,  a larger number are devoting themselves towards fostering a harmonious world. These students of SIFE-IIT Delhi give us a glimpse of the power of  brotherhood that is keeping humanity alive.

 

SIFE (Student In Free Enterprise) - is an international non-profit organization that aims to mobilize university students to make a difference in their communities and become socially responsible business leaders.

 

SIFE IIT Delhi ...

(Wednesday, 26 June 2013 15:19)
Vellore Institute of Technology University breaks Guinness world record with its giant hand...

 

 

 

India’s premier engineering college, Vellore Institute of Technology has set a new world record.

 

In a first of its kind record in India, 3,005 people formed a giant human hand in the open ground near the silver jubilee tower at Vellore Institute of Technology University campus in Vellore, Chennai, India,setting the new world record for the Largest human hand, according to the World Record Academy.

 

The world record attempt was done under the banner Pragathi to beat the previous ...

(Wednesday, 26 June 2013 15:08)
Indian teenager invents self defence device for women...

Delhi teenager, Manu Chopra,  has designed a device which can be worn like a wrist watch that delivers an electric shock once it touches the attacker’s skin...

 

The average speed of nerve impulses transmitted from the brain to other parts of the body is 60 metre per second. In case of any attempt of molestation, the speed of the nerve impulses increase to 119 metre per second. It is then that this device detects the increased nerve impulse and stings the attacker with a small electric shock ...

(Wednesday, 26 June 2013 15:02)
India committed Rs 10,000 crore (2.5 B$) to indigenously develop the world’s fastest supercomputer by 2017...

India committed Rs 10,000 crore ( 2.5 Billion$ ) to indigenously develop the world’s fastest supercomputer by 2017. The Planning Commission agreed in principle to provide the funds to the Indian Space Research Organsiation (ISRO) and Indian Institute of Science (IIS), Bangalore to develop a supercomputer with a performance of 132.8 exaflops (132 quintillion floating operations per second). A quintillion has 18 zeros (a million has six)...

 

The world’s fastest supercomputer right now is a ...

(Wednesday, 26 June 2013 14:47)

The Potential for Waste to Energy in India…

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India has drawn the world’s attention in recent years with its booming economic growth, large demographic of young, English-speaking workers, and its shift from an agricultural to a more service-oriented economy. The consequence of this economic success has been a massive increase in waste. This article discusses the problems involved in managing such quantities and the opportunities it presents, particularly with regard to Waste to Energy...

 

A growing number of Indians are enjoying a new found ability to consume a vast number of goods and services that were previously either unavailable or unaffordable. From small electronic items, such as cell phones, to large consumer goods like refrigerators and cars, Indian consumption has been steadily increasing and shows no signs of abating anytime soon. Inevitably this has led to a rapid growth in the quantity and variety of MSW.


In most cities and towns in India, MSW is disposed of in an unregulated and unscientific manner in low-lying, open dumps on the outskirts of cities. Most dumps lack systems for leachate collection, landfill gas collection or monitoring, nor do they use inert materials to cover the waste. This results in ground and surface water contamination from runoff and lack of covering, air pollution caused by fires, toxic gases, and odour, and public health problems due to mosquitoes and scavenging animals.

 

In its 2009-10 Annual Report the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) estimated that approximately 55 million tonnes of MSW are generated in urban areas of India annually. It is estimated that the amount of waste generated in India will increase at a rate of approximately 1-1.33% annually.

The Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) promulgated the Municipal Solid Wastes (Management and Handling) Rules in 2000 requiring municipalities across India adopt sustainable and environmentally sound ways of processing MSW, including incineration. In this regard, Waste to Energy (WtE) provides a solution towards complying with government regulations, and achieving integrated solid waste management.

WtE is perceived as a means to dispose MSW, produce energy, recover materials, and free up scarce land that would otherwise have been used for landfill.

The Indian Government considers WtE to be a renewable technology, and the MNRE has developed the National Master Plan for Development of WtE in India. The MNRE lists a number of technologies for energy recovery from urban and industrial wastes that “not only reduce the quantity but also improve the quality of waste to meet the required pollution control standards, besides generating a substantial quantity of energy”.

The MNRE estimates that the potential to generate power from MSW will more than double in the next ten years, while the potential from industrial waste is likely to increase by more than 50%.

While the Indian Government’s own figures would suggest that the cost of WtE is somewhat higher than other renewable sources, it should be kept in mind that WtE facilities serve a dual role of waste disposal and energy production. Although the cost per MW of capacity may be greater than other renewable sources, the benefits of waste management, energy and metals recovery, and reduction of GHG emissions need to be considered.

 

 

Considering WtE for Mumbai City...

Mumbai, India’s financial capital and largest city, has been facing a solid waste management crisis for years. The infrastructure has been unable to keep pace with economic development and population growth. In order to move towards a sustainable future and achieve its goal of becoming a world-class city, Mumbai needs to adopt an integrated solid waste management approach.

 

The agency responsible for solid waste management in Mumbai is the Solid Waste Management Department (SWMD) of the Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (MCGM) and its private contractors. The 2009-10 budget of the SWMD is Rs.10.6 billion (US$228 million), and is expected to increase to Rs.15.5 billion ($334 million) in 2010-11.

The municipal corporation spends roughly Rs.1160 per tonne ($25/tonne) on collection, transport, and disposal of MSW. Collection and transport together constitute roughly 80% of the cost. In India, the average municipal expenditure on solid waste management is Rs.500 to Rs.1500 per tonne ($10 to $32 per tonne).

 

Suitability of WtE in Mumbai...

The MSW collected in Mumbai consists of wet organics (primarily food waste), dry organics (straw and wood, etc.), inert materials (sand and soil), and recyclables (plastics, metal, glass and paper). Based on the composition of MSW, processing the waste in a WtE facility would reduce its volume by 96.74%, thus freeing up land that would otherwise have been used for landfills.

 

The chemical characteristics of MSW in Mumbai have been measured by two different studies, one by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) and the National Environmental Engineering Research Institute (NEERI) in 2005-06, and the other by MCGM around the same time.

The reported moisture content and heating value differs significantly between the two studies, however, the CPCB-NEERI study found that the heating value of MSW in Mumbai is sufficient for a WtE plant to operate without additional fuel. From an environmental standpoint, a WtE facility would be beneficial because it would prevent the formation of leachate that contaminates groundwater, reduce emissions of toxic pollutants from the burning of garbage, and prevent the production of two potent greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide and methane.

Additionally, with space in urban areas at a premium WtE provides an effective way to reduce the volume of waste by approximately 90% and thereby lower the space needed for landfills.

 

Education...

More research is needed to quantify various aspects of the solid waste management sector. A number of key statistics, such as the value of recyclables, the amount of environmental pollution from waste sources, and the quantity of industrial waste generated, need to be computed to gain a better understanding of this sector. In terms of research related to WtE, detailed analysis of costs and available funding is needed. In addition, investigating the suitability and quantifying the costs and benefits of combined heat and power for Mumbai would be useful. Independent researchers or consultants should carry out such research in order to prevent any biases that may otherwise occur.

Outreach to both environmental groups as well as the public at large is important in order to demonstrate the benefits of WtE technology to the community, city, and local government. This can be achieved by educating the public through campaigns, workshops, town hall meetings, university lectures, and so on. Creating an open dialogue with environmental groups is an essential first step to sharing information and collaborating to create better environmental conditions.

- Formerlly a junior professional associate at the World Bank, Perinaz Bhada-Tata is currently working as a consultant in India...

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